April 23, 2014
harvestheart:

Camel in Yemen

harvestheart:

Camel in Yemen

April 23, 2014
harvestheart:

Fetch

harvestheart:

Fetch

April 23, 2014
bassman5911:

Fishing Village, Hong Kong by Diane and Tom Sullivan on Flickr.

bassman5911:

Fishing Village, Hong Kong by Diane and Tom Sullivan on Flickr.

(via fishstickmonkey)

April 22, 2014
design-is-fine:

Yusaku Kamekura, poster artwork for World Expo’70 Osaka, 1970. Japan. Source

design-is-fine:

Yusaku Kamekura, poster artwork for World Expo’70 Osaka, 1970. Japan. Source

(via subdub)

April 22, 2014
"友人に3児の母がいるんだけど、家事育児を一切しない旦那さんのことを「名誉長男」って呼んでます。"

Twitter / fukazume_taro: 友人に3児の母がいるんだけど、家事育児を一切しない旦那さんの … (via eternityscape)

(via konishiroku)

April 22, 2014

by mlisowsk

by mlisowsk

(Source: hijisuru, via fishstickmonkey)

April 22, 2014
tamazo2:

芦屋浜団地(1979年~1982年竣工)
 兵庫県芦屋市
 2014

tamazo2:

芦屋浜団地(1979年~1982年竣工)
兵庫県芦屋市
2014

April 22, 2014

(Source: redefinedrose, via hetaremozu)

April 22, 2014

kateoplis:

PhotochromsDetroit Photographic Company, 1888-1924

(via timtimtim)

April 21, 2014

blue-voids:

1970’s interiors, Verner Panton

(via french-cognac)

April 20, 2014

(via naimononedari)

April 20, 2014

magictransistor:

葛飾 北斎 (Katsushika Hokusai)

(via bibidebabideboo)

April 20, 2014

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via

Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 

Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.

The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 

SoP | Scale of Environments

(via nezzz)

April 18, 2014

cats & boxes

(Source: dope-pope, via nimben)

April 18, 2014

ryanpanos:

Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via

The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.

For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.

The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

(via fishstickmonkey)